• Hay-Day Walks

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    Discover more about Cumbria's upland hay meadows and the work being done to restore them on the Hay-Day walks.

    Hay-Day Walks

  • Protecting Wildlife For The Future

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    Help Cumbria Wildlife Trust conserve the wildlife and wild places of Cumbria for the future.

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Birds

© Mike Read

A predominantly nocturnal bird of prey, found in the coastal plain of the Solway and the Eden Valley. Breeding pairs in Cumbria 150-200

© Margaret Holland

A ground nesting bird found in the northern Pennines part of Cumbria, 185 breeding males in 2000.

© Derek Radcliffe

A large thickset bird of prey, measuring 51-57 cm the female being larger than the male.

Corncrake-cpt Richard Wesley

A secretive, solitary summer migrant bird, now rare in Cumbria with only 2 pairs known to have nested in recent years.

© Andreas Trepte

The curlew is present throughout most of Cumbria although breeding records are now scare within the Lakeland Fells. The Breeding Birds of Cumbria (2001) estimates the population in Cumbria  at 10,500 breeding pairs.

© Dave Appleton

A wading bird is often a nocturnal feeder.The Golden Plover arrives onto the mountain tops from its lowland wintering grounds in the  spring. The Cumbrian  breeding population of 1,500 is found mainly in the northern Pennines with a few in the Lake District high fells.

© Frank Vassen

Found breeding in hedgerows and verges on the edge of grassland. Breeding pairs in Cumbria are estimated to be  2,500.

© Hans Hillewaert

Also known as Green Plover or Peewit, the latter due to its call. Breeding population in Cumbria 11,500 pairs, found county wide apart from the high fell areas.

© Stefan Johansson

The UK’s smallest falcon is an elusive bird with a sparse population. To be found in the north eastern Lakeland fells and the north Pennines with just 50 breeding pairs in the county.

© Terry Pickford

A bird of the mountain crags. With between  90 – 110 breeding pairs Cumbria is believed to have the highest breeding density in the world.

© Tom Marshall

The UK’s leading game bird with its main Cumbria home found in the northern Pennines. Scarce in central high fells of Cumbria with a few found on the moors of the coastal plain. Population of breeding pairs in Cumbria estimated to be  2,500 – 3,000 in 2001.
The UK’s leading game bird with its main Cumbria home found in the northern Pennines. Scarce in central high fells of Cumbria with a few found on the moors of the coastal plain. Population of breeding pairs in Cumbria estimated to be  2,500 – 3,000 in 2001.

Red Legged Partridge

Brighter and more conspicuous than the smaller grey partridge this french import is quite rare in Cumbria with, only 60-80 breeding pairs found mainly along the eastern fringes of the Lake District and the northern Pennines

Rook

Gregarious birds living in colonies known as “rookeries” the Rook is a bird of farmland and grassland. In Cumbria they live in most areas except the high fells with the population estimated at 45,000 pairs in 2001.

© Amy Lewis

A bird of the open countryside with a distinctive song, the Skylark is widely distributed across Cumbria. Breeding pairs in Cumbria 28,000.

© Margaret Holland

Our most common nocturnal  bird of prey. In Cumbria they are widely distributed, most numerous in sheltered woodland valleys but not found in the exposed treeless areas of the high fells. Breeding pairs in Cumbria estimated at 5,000 in 2001.